December 9, 2018

Please reload

Recent Posts

Kyoto Journal, Ken Rogers

December 9, 2018

1/1
Please reload

Featured Posts

Rattle, Timothy Green

 

Rattle began in Spring of 1995. It is published four times a year once in the Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. The magazine is solely a poetry magazine, and they are looking for poetry that “is accessible, interesting, moving, and memorable. If it makes you laugh or cry, then it’s the kind of poem that rattles around inside you for years, and it’s our kind of poem.” The misson of the magazine is to promote poetry. They also have an Anthology of Young Poets, where they highlight the best poetry by younger writers. Interview with Timothy Green, Editor of Rattle.

 

How did you become interested in editing? What was your first job in the editing community?

Honestly, I only became interested in editing after becoming an editor. It was never something that I planned on or sought out, or even knew existed, really. As an undergraduate, I pursued a duel-major in biochemistry and English, because I liked them both—creative writing was a hobby, and maybe I’d write a science fiction novel while science paid the bills. But after a few years doing a work-study in an mRNA lab, I realized that I didn’t have a passion for it—it was too much minutia, too little revelation. There was a specific day when one of the techniques the lab was developing finally worked, and everyone was so excited, and I pretended to be excited, and I realized that I didn’t want to spend the rest of my life pretending to be excited. I’d already been skipping course labs too often, so that I could finish a story or write a poem. So I dropped the duel, and just became a directionless English major. Our college had a student-run lit mag, and I was on the staff, but it never even occurred to me that it might someday become a career—the thought literally never crossed my mind.