Kyoto Journal, Ken Rogers

Kyoto Journal is a non-profit magazine focused on “society, beliefs, traditions and new developments through a lens of Asian experience.” The magazine has contributors share Asian insights in the form of special features and interviews as well as creative writing and reviews and more. The name Kyoto Journal is a physical location, as well as “a place of deep spiritual and cultural heritage, and has been the measure of such things here in Japan for more than a millennium…Essentially, Kyoto Journal is a community that transcends place, while respecting and celebrating regional and local identity.” How did you get involved with Kyoto Journal? What made you want to become a part of the Kyoto Jou

Black Warrior Review, Bethany Startin

“Black Warrior Review is named after the river that borders the campus of The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. The city, river, and journal derive their names from the sixteenth-century Indian chief Tuscaloosa, whose name comes from two words of Creek or Choctaw origin—tusca (warrior) and lusa (black).” Black Warrior Review was established in 1974 by the University of Alabama Creative Writing MFA students. The magazine publishes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art by known and emerging writers. Each issue of the magazine has a chapbook from an established poet. To read past issues and learn more about Black Warrior Review, visit http://bwr.ua.edu/. How did you become interested in editi

Black Warrior Review, Robert Hitt

“Black Warrior Review is named after the river that borders the campus of The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. The city, river, and journal derive their names from the sixteenth-century Indian chief Tuscaloosa, whose name comes from two words of Creek or Choctaw origin—tusca (warrior) and lusa (black).” Black Warrior Review was established in 1974 by the University of Alabama Creative Writing MFA students. The magazine publishes poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and art by known and emerging writers. Each issue of the magazine has a chapbook from an established poet. How did you become interested in editing? What path led you to the position you’re in now? A couple of years ago I enrolled in

Brevity, Dinty W. Moore

Brevity is a small online magazine that focuses on literary flash nonfiction, as well as book reviews and craft essays. The magazine has a wide audience of readers and submitters, with work coming in from places such as India, Japan, Malaysia, Spain, Ireland and Egypt. The magazine publishes both well-known and emerging writers, and has been around for more than 17 years. The staff is almost entirely volunteer based. Could you begin by sharing what exactly you would consider to be Brevity’s mission? Do you believe the current magazine accomplishes this mission? Our mission has evolved in the past seventeen years. Originally, being small, unknown and on the internet only, we saw our mission a

Passages North, Matt Weinkam

Passages North is an annual literary magazine based in at Northern Michigan University. It has been around for about 35 years. Passages North accepts fiction, nonfiction, poetry, hybrid essays, and short-shorts, as well as spoken-word poetry published on the website. They have a section on their website called the Writers on Writing Series, where anyone can contribute short essays about the process of writing. Current and old issues can be purchased on the site. How did you become interested in editing? What path led you to the position you’re in now? I started editing working on Inklings, the undergraduate journal at Miami University where I went to college. Reading student submissions gave

Passages North, Jennifer Howard

Passages North is an annual literary magazine based in at Northern Michigan University. It has been around for about 35 years. Passages North accepts fiction, nonfiction, poetry, hybrid essays, and short-shorts, as well as spoken-word poetry published on the website. They have a section on their website called the Writers on Writing Series, where anyone can contribute short essays about the process of writing. Current and old issues can be purchased on the site. How did Passages North get started? PN was started in 1979 at Bay de Noc Community College in Escanaba, Michigan, a town about an hour south of here on Lake Michigan. Then, it was printed on newspaper, would get your hands dirty with

Meat for Tea: The Valley Review, Elizabeth MacDuffie

Meat for Tea: The Valley Review was founded by Elizabeth MacDuffie and Alexandra Wagman. Their mission is to “recognize and feature the work of artists, writers, and musicians living in western Massachusetts and beyond.” The magazine takes poetry, visual art and short fiction. Simultaneous submissions are welcome. One quirk of Meat for Tea is that every time a new issue of the magazine is launched, it is accompanied by a Cirque. These Cirques are usually local and include local bands and various other artists. Meat For Tea recently won an award through the Bookbuilders of Boston in their 2014 annual book show. How did you get started with Meat for Tea? When I was an adjunct professor of Engl

The Common, Jennifer Acker

The Common editor, Jennifer Acker, talks with FUSE about her experience with editing and publishing. The Common is a biannual literary magazine based at Amherst College that has been recently cited by The New Yorker as a journal that’s found its way. It publishes fiction, essays, poetry, documentary vignettes, and images that embody “a modern sense of place.” The editors seek to capture an old idea: that the extraordinary can be found in the commonplace. Let’s start at the beginning. How did you become interested in editing? What path led you to the position you’re in now? What I love about magazines is that they involve a sustained community because issues are continually published over t

Gargoyle, Richard Peabody

Gargoyle was founded in 1976 by Russell Cox, Richard Peabody, and Paul Pasquarella. By 1977, Peabody was the only member of the original triumvirate left. He ran the mag until 1990 with several co-editors through the years, most notably Gretchen Johnsen (1979-1986) and Peggy Pfeiffer (1988-1990). Based in the Washington, D.C., metro area, Gargoyle was dedicated to printing work by unknown poets and fiction writers, as well as seeking out the overlooked or neglected. The magazine archive is housed in the Special Collections at George Washington University’s Gelman Library in DC (some back issues are still available to the public as well—read on). The mag was on something of an extended hiatus

The Kenyan Review, Zach Savich

The Kenyon Review editor, Zach Savich, talks with FUSE about editing and publishing. The Kenyon Review is a prestigious magazine, both because of the excellent standard of literature it publishes–it has recently been ranked 3rd for poetry and 9th for fiction by Pushcart Prize Literary Magazine Ranking–and for it’s long life–it was founded in 1939. It is backed by Kenyon College in Gamble, Ohio and publishes poetry, fiction, non-fiction and book reviews. It supports writers not only by finding new voices, but also by hosting a reading series, a literary festival, and writer workshops, both for adults and students. They have a lively and intelligent blog that has guest authors and staff write

Mangrove

Mangrove is an undergraduate magazine that really is more than the sum of its parts, Mangrove takes its readers on a different literary journey with each new edition. With pieces brought together because of content rather than form, Mangrove breaks the mold set by many other more traditional undergraduate magazines. Mangrove is currently published at the University of Miami, the publish quality fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and more recently artwork and photography. This might be something of a silly sounding question but why the title of Mangrove? Somewhere in the area of 10-15 years ago Mangrove was a graduate student run journal at the University of Miami that published all kinds of submi

New Letters, Robert Stewart

In February, Amanda Chase (Susquehanna University) conducted an interview with Robert Stewart, editor of New Letters. Let’s start at the beginning. How did you become interested in editing? What path led you to the position you’re in now? Sometime in the mid 1990s, while reading the Zen scholar R. H. Blyth – one of the guiding forces of my life – I came across the statement, “The work you are doing is your work.” That was the first time I realized that I might actually be an editor. I had started as a volunteer at New Letters magazine many years before, in the late 1970s, and proceeded to work there on the paid staff, part time into the early 1980s; I then got a job as editor of an art-cri

Grist, Christian Anton Gerard

Grist: A Journal For Writers Editor-in-Chief, Christian Anton Gerard, talks with FUSE about his experiences in editing and publishing. Grist is an annual literary magazine produced by the University of Tennessee. It features fiction, poetry, editorial interviews, and creative nonfiction discussions of craft. Grist accepts both accessible and innovative fiction from both new and established authors, and seeks mainly “quality”in their selected submissions. Grist is a forum that is strongly dedicated to creating a space for quality literature and discussions on craft. How did you become interested in editing? How’d you end up at Grist? Grist: The Journal for Writers is a publication of the Depa

Ploughshares, Andrew Martucci

Ploughshares is a literary magazine that was first created by DeWitt Henry and Peter O’Malley in 1970. The idea for the magazine was thought up in a bar in Cambridge, MA called Plough Stars. The magazine was created in hopes of creating a literary outlet for young writers in the New England area. Today, the magazine is run out of Emerson college. Ploughshares currently published four issues a year, and has a guest editor for each issue. Previous writers featured include Tim O’Brien, Richard Yates, and Brian Moore. How did you become interested in becoming an editor? What was your first job in the editing community, and how did you end up working for Ploughshares? I started working in publish

The White Review, Benjamin Eastham and Jacques Testard

The White Review is a fairly new quarterly arts journal that is published both online and in print. Its focus is artistically and educationally meritorious works created by new or emerging artists. Its aim is the promotion of the arts and literature and of advancing education in arts and literature. It takes its name and some inspiration from La Revue Blanche, a Parisian magazine which ran from 1889 to 1903. The White Review’s head editors are Benjamin Eastham and Jacques Testard. The magazine is based in Knightsbridge, London and accepts work from anywhere and anyone. FUSE interviews The White Review head editors, Benjamin Eastham and Jacques Testard. The White Review is a fairly new arts

Granta, John Freeman

Granta magazine was founded in 1889 by students at Cambridge University. It underwent a rebirth in 1979, when it focused more on new writing from people beyond Cambridge. Every issue since 1979 is available in print. The magazine does not have a political or literary manifesto, but it has “a belief in the power and urgency of the story, both in fiction and non-fiction, and the story’s supreme ability to describe, illuminate and make real.” John Freeman was the head editor for the magazine from 2009 to 2013. It is open to submissions at varying times throughout the year. Granta has published many now-famous writers in the past such as A. A. Milne, Sylvia Plath, and Ted Hughes. FUSE interviews

Sonora Review, Mike Coakley

Sonora Review was founded in 1980, run by students in the Creative Writing department at the University of Arizona. It is one of the oldest student-run literary journals in America. It accepts fiction, poetry and nonfiction from September through May, only previously unpublished work by emerging or well-known authors. Each year, varying contests are held for poetry, fiction and nonfiction, the winner receiving a 1,000 dollar cash prize and publication in the following issue of the magazine. The staff changes with every two issues, so each year there is a different aesthetic and a different overall feel to the magazine as a whole. The current head editors are Mike Coakley and Laura Miller. FU

Juked, John W. Wang

Juked magazine was founded in 1999. It is an independent journal that is both online and in print annually. Juked gets all of its funding from donations which help with printing and web hosting costs. The magazine is open for submissions year round and they accept poetry, fiction and nonfiction. There is no one defining theme or subject matter that the magazine focuses on, but rather an overall mission of publishing the best work they come across, with a special emphasis on new and emerging writers. John W. Wang has been the editor of Juked for years and hopes that it will continue on with as much quality writing as it has now. FUSE interviews the head editor of Juked, John W. Wang. Starting

Hobart, Aaron Burch

Hobart magazine was founded in 2001 by Aaron Burch. It is a biannual magazine print magazine that comes out irregularly, about three times every two years. Every April is devoted to a baseball issue. Each genre’s sub-editor reads all the submissions for their section, and chooses which ones to publish. The magazine also has irregular submission dates, and they accept fiction, poetry and nonfiction. Hobart is also connected to a small press where they publish books with Elizabeth Ellen as editor. I love the idea behind the April Baseball issue. Why baseball? Any special significance? Baseball just because I love baseball. About ten years ago (I think 2003 was the first year we did it?), it go

Stone Soup, Gerry Mandel

Stone Soup is a print and ebook magazine written and illustrated by young writers and artists. William Rubel and Gerry Mandel began the magazine in 1973 in Santa Cruz, California. It is published six times a year, in January, March, May, July, September, and November. The goal of the magazine is to inspire children by highlighting the best work made by their peers. As well as a magazine, Stone Soup is a nonprofit organization called the Children’s Art Foundation. The Children’s Art Foundation collection has over 1000 high quality art prints from children from over 36 countries across the world. Interview with Stone Soup Editor Gerry Mandel What is it like to be a magazine that works with chi

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